Educate Retailers on Food Donation Legislation

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YAML Idea

Educate Retailers on Legislation

The perception seems to be that donating food is a legal liability - if someone got sick from eating that food then the retailer would be liable. However, there is no precedent for this as there has never been a case

An education team with a pro bono lawyer could probably convince some big food retailers to spend their social consciousness money on donating expiring perishable foods to local charities/homeless shelters etc.

Other problems are that this would only help food poverty in relatively well off countries. Also, it seems to be cheaper for retailers to throw out expiring food than to donate


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[colemai], I do agree that legislation is a problem when convincing retailers to donate food, although how to make it a scalable solution?

_> An education team with a pro bono lawyer could probably convince some big food retailers to spend their social consciousness money on donating expiring perishable foods to local charities/homeless shelters etc. _

Thing is, that big retailers would be interested in providing their time to deal with lawyers if only they would see such act as a return not a cost. I wonder, how we can make it more convenient and less time consuming for retailers to donate food with less effort?

_> Other problems are that this would only help food poverty in relatively well off countries. _ You might like an idea shared by [gmikhai] where he talks about how to deal with hunger in developing countries. Quote: "On the other hand, restaurants, bistros, and other eateries throw out a lot of food waste. They could be relatively inexpensively disinfected, freeze dried, homogenized, and finally pressed into balls or briquettes. These balls shall be available for free near any restaurant, supermarket, and other public places, especially in poor countries." (see a picture in the article)


--Ruta,

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